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Day 62: Females with Asperger’s Syndrome (Non-Official) Checklist | Everyday Asperger's

The more I read, the more I suspect that Asperger's / ASD is a part of me. I do not check ALL of the boxes (not that there are boxed, but you know what I mean) but easily 75% - 80%.I will try to print this and actually tick the bullet points to get a number at some point. There is also a YouTube video of this checklist:

Adult female Asperger's syndrome traits - Slower and sensory friendly version

One or two of these rang VERY loud bells for me as well because I woke up at 13:35 in a panic because I thought that tomorrow was Granny's funeral and was panicking because the outfit I want to wear will not be washed and dried in time (our washer/dryer can no longer tumble dry and this item should not be tumbled anyway) but tomorrow is my Opthalmology consultant hospital appointment and the funeral is on the 6th.

Looking back in my childhood and at university especially, as well as how I am happiest housebound and at my desk, this explains so much about me. I wonder if I should even talk to a doctor about this or just assume a self-diagnosis. Let's face it, I knew I had MS for years before I was able to get a diagnosis and I doubt that an ASD diagnosis at this stage (at my age and in the UK) would achieve anything for me other than validation…

Copy/paste of the checklist for posterity and my own future reference:

Females with Aspergers Non-Official Checklist

By Samantha Craft of Everyday Asperger’s, March 2012

This is a non-official checklist created by an adult female with Asperger’s Syndrome who has a son with Asperger’s Syndrome. Samantha Craft holds a Masters Degree in Education. Samantha Craft does not hold a doctorate in Psychiatry or Psychology. She has a life-credential as a result of being a female with Asperger’s Syndrome and being a parent of a child with Asperger’s Syndrome. She has created this list in an effort to assist mental health professionals in recognizing Asperger’s Syndrome in females.

Suggested Use: Check off all areas that strongly apply to the person. If each area has 75%-80% of the statements checked, or more, then you may want to consider that the female may have Asperger’s Syndrome.

Section A: Deep Thinkers

1. A deep thinker

2. A prolific writer drawn to poetry

3. Highly intelligent

4. Sees things at multiple levels including thinking processes.

5. Analyzes existence, the meaning of life, and everything continually.

6. Serious and matter-of-fact in nature.

7. Doesn’t take things for granted.

8. Doesn’t simplify.

9. Everything is complex.

10. Often gets lost in own thoughts and “checks out.” (blank stare)

Section B: Innocent

1. Naïve

2. Honest

3. Experiences trouble with lying.

4. Finds it difficult to understand manipulation and disloyalty.

5. Finds it difficult to understand vindictive behavior and retaliation.

6. Easily fooled and conned.

7. Feelings of confusion and being overwhelmed

8. Feelings of being misplaced and/or from another planet

9. Feelings of isolation

10. Abused or taken advantage of as a child but didn’t think to tell anyone.

Section C: Escape and Friendship

1. Survives overwhelming emotions and senses by escaping in thought or action.

2. Escapes regularly through fixations, obsessions, and over-interest in subjects.

3. Escapes routinely through imagination, fantasy, and daydreaming.

4. Escapes through mental processing.

5. Escapes through the rhythm of words.

6. Philosophizes continually.

7. Had imaginary friends in youth.

8. Imitates people on television or in movies.

9. Treated friends as “pawns” in youth, e.g., friends were “students,” “consumers,” “soldiers.”

10. Makes friends with older or younger females.

11. Imitates friends or peers in style, dress, and manner.

12. Obsessively collects and organizes objects.

13. Mastered imitation.

14. Escapes by playing the same music over and over.

15. Escapes through a relationship (imagined or real).

16. Numbers bring ease.

17. Escapes through counting, categorizing, organizing, rearranging.

18. Escapes into other rooms at parties.

19. Cannot relax or rest without many thoughts.

20. Everything has a purpose.

Section D: Comorbid Attributes

1. OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Disorder)

2. Sensory Issues (sight, sound, texture, smells, taste)

3. Generalized Anxiety

4. Sense of pending danger or doom

5. Feelings of polar extremes (depressed/over-joyed; inconsiderate/over-sensitive)

6. Poor muscle tone, double-jointed, and/or lack in coordination

7. Eating disorders, food obsessions, and/or worry about what is eaten.

8. Irritable bowel and/or intestinal issues

9. Chronic fatigue and/or immune challenges

10. Misdiagnosed or diagnosed with other mental illness and/or labeled hypochondriac.

11. Questions place in the world.

12. Often drops small objects

13. Wonders who she is and what is expected of her.

14. Searches for right and wrong.

15. Since puberty, has had bouts of depression.

16. Flicks/rubs fingernails, flaps hands, rubs hands together, tucks hands under or between legs, keeps closed fists, and/or clears throat often.

Section E: Social Interaction

1. Friends have ended friendship suddenly and without person understanding why.

2. Tendency to over-share.

3. Spills intimate details to strangers.

4. Raised hand too much in class or didn’t participate in class.

5. Little impulse control with speaking when younger.

6. Monopolizes conversation at times.

7. Bring subject back to self.

8. Comes across at times as narcissistic and controlling. (Is not narcissistic.)

9. Shares in order to reach out.

10. Sounds eager and over-zealous at times.

11. Holds a lot of thoughts, ideas, and feelings inside.

12. Feels as if she is attempting to communicate “correctly.”

13. Obsesses about the potentiality of a relationship with someone, particularly a love interest.

14. Confused by the rules of accurate eye contact, tone of voice, proximity of body, stance, and posture in conversation.

15. Conversation can be exhausting.

16. Questions the actions and behaviors of self and others, continually.

17. Feels as if missing a conversation “gene” or thought-“filter”

18. Trained self in social interactions through readings and studying of other people.

19. Visualizes and practices how she will act around others.

20. Practices in mind what she will say to another before entering the room.

21. Difficulty filtering out background noise when talking to others.

22. Has a continuous dialogue in mind that tells her what to say and how to act when in a social situations.

23. Sense of humor sometimes seems quirky, odd, or different from others.

24. As a child, it was hard to know when it was her turn to talk.

25. She finds norms of conversation confusing.

Section F: Finds Refuge when Alone

1. Feels extreme relief when she doesn’t have to go anywhere, talk to anyone, answer calls, or leave the house.

2. One visitor at the home may be perceived as a threat.

3. Knowing logically a house visitor is not a threat, doesn’t relieve the anxiety.

4. Feelings of dread about upcoming events and appointments on the calendar.

5. Knowing she has to leave the house causes anxiety from the moment she wakes up.

6. All the steps involved in leaving the house are overwhelming and exhausting to think about.

7. She prepares herself mentally for outings, excursions, meetings, and appointments.

8. Question next steps and movements continually.

9. Telling self the “right” words and/or positive self-talk doesn’t often alleviate anxiety.

10. Knowing she is staying home all day brings great peace of mind.

11. Requires a large amount of down time or alone time.

12. Feels guilty after spending a lot of time on a special interest.

13. Uncomfortable in public locker rooms, bathrooms, and/or dressing rooms.

14. Dislikes being in a crowded mall, crowded gym, or crowded theater.

Section G: Sensitive

1. Sensitive to sounds, textures, temperature, and/or smells when trying to sleep.

2. Adjusts bedclothes, bedding, and/or environment in an attempt to find comfort.

3. Dreams are anxiety-ridden, vivid, complex, and/or precognitive in nature.

4. Highly intuitive to others’ feelings.

5. Takes criticism to heart.

6. Longs to be seen, heard, and understood.

7. Questions if she is a “normal” person.

8. Highly susceptible to outsiders’ viewpoints and opinions.

9. At times adapts her view of life or actions based on others’ opinions or words.

10. Recognizes own limitations in many areas daily.

11. Becomes hurt when others question or doubt her work.

12. Views many things as an extension of self.

13. Fears others opinions, criticism, and judgment.

14. Dislikes words and events that hurt animals and people.

15. Collects or rescues animals. (often in childhood)

16. Huge compassion for suffering.

17. Sensitive to substances. (environmental toxins, foods, alcohol, etc.)

18. Tries to help, offers unsolicited advice, or formalizes plans of action.

19. Questions life purpose and how to be a “better” person.

20. Seeks to understand abilities, skills, and/or gifts.

Section H: Sense of Self

1. Feels trapped between wanting to be herself and wanting to fit in.

2. Imitates others without realizing.

3. Suppresses true wishes.

4. Exhibits codependent behaviors.

5. Adapts self in order to avoid ridicule.

6. Rejects social norms and/or questions social norms.

7. Feelings of extreme isolation.

8. Feeling good about self takes a lot of effort and work.

9. Switches preferences based on environment and other people.

10. Switches behavior based on environment and other people.

11. Didn’t care about her hygiene, clothes, and appearance before teenage years and/or before someone else pointed these out to her.

12. “Freaks out” but doesn’t know why until later.

13. Young sounding voice

14. Trouble recognizing what she looks like and/or has occurrences of slight prosopagnosia (difficulty recognizing or remembering faces).

Section I: Confusion

1. Had a hard time learning others are not always honest.

2. Feelings seem confusing, illogical, and unpredictable. (self’s and others’)

3. Confuses appointment times, numbers, or dates.

4. Expects that by acting a certain way certain results can be achieved, but realizes in dealing with emotions, those results don’t always manifest.

5. Spoke frankly and literally in youth.

6. Jokes go over the head.

7. Confused when others ostracize, shun, belittle, trick, and betray.

8. Trouble identifying feelings unless they are extreme.

9. Trouble with emotions of hate and dislike.

10. Feels sorry for someone who has persecuted or hurt her.

11. Personal feelings of anger, outrage, deep love, fear, giddiness, and anticipation seem to be easier to identify than emotions of joy, satisfaction, calmness, and serenity.

12. Situations and conversations sometimes perceived as black or white.

13. The middle spectrum of outcomes, events, and emotions is sometimes overlooked or misunderstood. (All or nothing mentality)

14. A small fight might signal the end of a relationship or collapse of world.

15. A small compliment might boost her into a state of bliss.

Section J: Words and Patterns

1. Likes to know word origins.

2. Confused when there is more than one meaning to a word.

3. High interest in songs and song lyrics.

4. Notices patterns frequently.

5. Remembers things in visual pictures.

6. Remembers exact details about someone’s life.

7. Has a remarkable memory for certain details.

8. Writes or creates to relieve anxiety.

9. Has certain “feelings” or emotions towards words.

10. Words bring a sense of comfort and peace, akin to a friendship.

(Optional) Executive Functioning This area isn’t always as evident as other areas

1. Simple tasks can cause extreme hardship.

2. Learning to drive a car or rounding the corner in a hallway can be troublesome.

3. New places offer their own set of challenges.

4. Anything that requires a reasonable amount of steps, dexterity, or know-how can rouse a sense of panic.

5. The thought of repairing, fixing, or locating something can cause anxiety.

6. Mundane tasks are avoided.

7. Cleaning may seem insurmountable at times.

8. Many questions come to mind when setting about to do a task.

9. Might leave the house with mismatched socks, shirt buttoned incorrectly, and/or have dyslexia.

10. A trip to the grocery store can be overwhelming.

11. Trouble copying dance steps, aerobic moves, or direction in a sports gym class.

12. Has a hard time finding certain objects in the house, but remembers with exact clarity where other objects are.

This list was compiled after nine years of readings, research, and experience associated with Asperger’s Syndrome. More information can be found at http://aspergersgirls.wordpress.com © Everyday Aspergers, 2012 This non-official checklist can be printed for therapists, counselors, psychiatrists, psychologists, professors, teachers, and relatives, if Samantha Craft’s name and contact information remain on the print out.


Also copied to my Evernote.

ETA: Once printed, ticked and calculated I got 90.66%.

Okay. Wow. My breakdown by section:
A: 9/10
B: 8/10
C: 15.5/20 (The half is for a couple of "kinda maybe" answers.)
D: 15/16
E: 23/25
F: 14/14
G: 20/20
H: 14/14
I: 15/15
J: 9/10
K, the optional last section: 8/12
Total: 150.5/166 = 0.9066265060241 (or 90.66%).

If I leave out the half point for the "kinda" answers it is still 0.90361445783133 and so still more than 90%. Huh. Also note the four sections that I get a "perfect" score (F, G, H and I).

I answered many questions as if for my childhood and young adulthood. Before the MonSter (M.S. / multiple sclerosis) made some things better and a load of other things even worse.

I wish I was seeing a counsellor still so that we could talk about this.



Comments

( 7 comments — Leave a comment )
cbpotts
Apr. 28th, 2014 05:38 pm (UTC)
Holy crap. I checked more than 90% of these boxes. I need to sit & think about what that means.
natf
Apr. 28th, 2014 09:19 pm (UTC)
Oh. Not just me then. I am sorry to have triggered feels and thinks for you but hope that any thinks and feels are productive and not destructive. *safe hugs if wanted*

I have always been a nerd/geek and I guess that is how it gets us girls. Programmers, knitters, writers - we all have a lot in common in that we are comfortable sitting alone in front of a computer screen for hours on end. I have also found it really interesting that ASD is so different for girls/women and boys/men as we have long suspected that hubby is on the spectrum as well but only in about the last week I have been reading more about how ASD affects women so very differently and I have begun to wonder if it is just one more thing that hubby and I have in common.

I have a few DID / multiplicity people on my LJFriends list and tumblr dashboard as well as a number of ASD people as well and so I have been reading around about both for a few weeks. I guess it just clicked with me on the ASD front.
cbpotts
Apr. 28th, 2014 11:15 pm (UTC)
I found it to be super eye opening. You see, a lot of those behaviors I thought were developed as coping mechanisms of a childhood full of people who weren't very nice to me. To consider that they may have a source independent of that? In a way is very freeing, that my destiny/self isn't so completely shaped by other people's bad choices. And that's good in a very strange way.

Instead of being a stressy thing, it's kind of a reclaiming thing for me. At least that's how it feels right now. I'd never actually considered Aspberger's before. I don't know that I'll ever get diagnosed or dealt with or whatever, but it's something to keep in mind throughout future things. Thank you.
natf
Apr. 28th, 2014 11:19 pm (UTC)
I am glad not to have caused you any stress/pain.

I have updated the post with my "score" - also 90+%.
brightlotusmoon
Apr. 30th, 2014 12:05 am (UTC)
I'm glad I saw this. I mentally checked off every single thing as positive. Naturally some are more mild than others, but I am every single thing. I still do my best to see everything in shades of gray, since my brain keeps wanting that mentality of "the middle spectrum of outcomes, events, and emotions is sometimes overlooked or misunderstood". I think that may be the subcategory in which I can say I am weakest, since I try to see everything in the middle spectrum despite often misunderstandings.

And yet they call me "high functioning" autistic. Which I think proves that "functioning labels" need to be re-worded.
natf
Apr. 30th, 2014 01:19 am (UTC)
Yeah I had a feeling you would score "high" on this what with your pukka diagnosis and everything. I think medics still need to learn that ASD presents differently in females than in males. Female autists seem to appear more "high functioning" than male autists because their differences from NTs/allists help them be more able to "pass" as "normal" than males.

Yeah labels suck. That said, if I was to ever mention this checklist to my mum (71) I would have to "translate" it into her generations English and call myself high functioning. I have a BSc and MSc she will say! If only she could understand how much I went through to achieve them.

We are all different and all equal.
brightlotusmoon
May. 2nd, 2014 03:01 am (UTC)
Pukka. Heh. :)

In am actually pro-label, as they say, but only for myself.
( 7 comments — Leave a comment )
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