Nat S Ford (natf) wrote,
Nat S Ford
natf

Classroom Creativity : The Frontal Cortex

…which is why I was always castigated for staring out the window instead of looking at the blackboard.
From: Classroom Creativity : The Frontal Cortex

Oh, me too. One junior school teacher, Mr S* (whose class I was in at age nine), even used to write the time in the margin of my exercise book when we were writing a story or some other written, creative exercise to see how much I had written before he next checked. He would say, out loud and for the whole class to hear, that he expected me to finish that page in my notebook by XX:XX time. I had rarely done so within the alloted time though and I am certain, now, that this is because I could not write fast enough to get the story in my head down - my thoughts ran (and still do run, even with the MonSter's interference) faster than I can write. I can type fast enough, some of the time, despite never learning to touch-type, but I never managed to hand-write fast enough and, in those days, there were no PCs, let alone laptops and definitely not one per child! I would think and the story would run away with me. They (Mr S* and my parents) would call it daydreaming but, lets face it, Mr S* wanted me to write a story and so to be creative and that was what I was doing! I know that the education systems in many first-world countries need some work and are getting worse not better but surely (as my nine-year-old self would have said) this is just common sense? If you want a child to be creative, let them imagine and ponder and give them time to write it down! At least, these days, many schools have laptops for the children so that kids that are like I was would have another way to get their creativity out into the world.
Tags: creativity, education, memoir
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